meteorological-spring

Meteorological Spring

March 3, 2015

You may be happy to know that yesterday March 1st marked the arrival of Meteorological Spring.  As an excerpt from the National Climatic Data Center explains below, meteorologists use whole calendar months that more closely represent the temperature cycles of the earth to denote the seasons, rather than an astronomically-based designation.   As a result, March, April, and May comprise meteorological spring, and we are officially in it.

“Meteorologists and climatologists break the seasons down into groupings of three months based on the annual temperature cycle as well as our calendar. We generally think of winter as the coldest time of the year and summer as the warmest time of the year, with spring and fall being the transition seasons, and that is what the meteorological seasons are based on. Meteorological spring includes March, April, and May; meteorological summer includes June, July, and August; meteorological fall includes September, October, and November; and meteorological winter includes December, January, and February. These seasons were created for meteorological observing and forecasting purposes, and they are more closely tied to our monthly civil calendar than the astronomical seasons are. The length of the seasons is also more consistent for the meteorological seasons, ranging from 90 days for winter of a non-leap year to 92 days for spring and summer. By following the civil calendar and having less variation in season length and season start, it becomes much easier to calculate seasonal statistics from the monthly statistics, both of which are very useful for agriculture, commerce, and a variety of other purposes.”

The-Astronomical-Seasons1

(Source:  http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/news/meteorological-versus-astronomical-summer%E2%80%94what%E2%80%99s-difference)